married men and the laity will not save us

I’ve seen some bad ideas floating around the Catholic blogosophere of late.

One, I hear that we could ordain married men to flush out the gay priests.  But is a married man more likely to be uncompromised by sexual sin than a homosexually-inclined, nominally-celibate priest?  Remember that contraception is a mortal sin.  Also, the modern clergy is just not very appealing to masculine men, so at best we might end up only as queer-ridden as the Mainline Protestants, which is hardly worth messing with tradition for.

Two, remember that no matter how awful the teaching of Pope Francis is, if the majority of the laity had their way, it would be far, far worse.  If it were true that Catholic doctrine is only valid if “received” (i.e. accepted) by the laity, then this would negate the Church’s teaching on contraception, cohabitation, divorce, homosexuality, and transubstantiation.  The laity would dismantle the Church faster than the clergy if they had the chance.

Thank God for the Church’s authoritarian structure.  Without it, we would be completely trapped within the bubble of modern prejudice.

I won’t say that the laity will never rebel against their clergy.  In fact, the Catholic laity was all in favor of punishing the Church with the contraception mandate.  Not for the first time–remember the French revolution–the Church was protected from her laity by Protestants with their heretical notion of religious freedom.  Or consider the frequent persecution of the Church in Latin America, where there are not enough Protestants to protect her (a preview of our future if our open-borders clergy have their way).  But if the laity do rebel, you can be sure it will be in the service of evil.  Really, I am a Catholic layman, and outsiders cannot fathom how vile and worthless we are.  Never grateful to the Church, never mind even the thought of suffering unpopularity for her defense.  Always so insufferably pleased with ourselves.  Always whining about how we deserve better.  And what we want is always more license to sin, more surrender to the world.

There is no reservoir of good Catholics to whom we can look to save us.  Quite a dilemma, I admit.

2 Responses

  1. “But is a married man more likely to be uncompromised by sexual sin than a homosexually-inclined, nominally-celibate priest?”
    Yes.
    “The laity would dismantle the Church faster than the clergy if they had the chance.”
    The Pope’s way is slower because it is more sinister and comprehensive. Breaking the Catholics down into smaller churches would at least leave a church of some sort behind. There will not be a Catholic Church of any kind left if it’s up to the clergy.
    “There is no reservoir of good Catholics to whom we can look to save us.”
    Then call the bad Catholics to repentance. Combat the people who are destroying your religion.
    Answer managed decline with something other than more managed decline.

  2. Bonald makes an empirical argument against the routine ordination of married men. I prefer a theoretical one. When you remove a constraint, the “value” of the optimization problem you are solving goes up. Closer to English, if a decision-maker is given a wider ambit for his decision, then he can more closely get what he wants.

    Who are the relevant decision-makers vis a vis ordination, and what do they want? The bishops and bad things. Loose their constraints, and watch bad things happen more. The trend, however weak it is, towards better priests will be snuffed out.

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