Good statement from USCCB

I should give credit where it’s due.  The reference to Pope Francis’ “integral ecology” was very apt and will hopefully inspire other Catholics to see the interconnectedness of the Church’s moral teachings.  “The unique meaning of marriage…inscribed on our bodies” sounds like something I might have written here.  “rooted in immutable nature, confirmed by divine revelation” is exactly right; this is natural law we’re defending.  Even the plea to be tolerated at the end bases itself not on some general freedom of religion or conscience, but on our having the truth.

Here is the statement:

Regardless of what a narrow majority of the Supreme Court may declare at this moment in history, the nature of the human person and marriage remains unchanged and unchangeable. Just as Roe v. Wade did not settle the question of abortion over forty years ago, Obergefell v. Hodges does not settle the question of marriage today. Neither decision is rooted in the truth, and as a result, both will eventually fail. Today the Court is wrong again. It is profoundly immoral and unjust for the government to declare that two people of the same sex can constitute a marriage.

The unique meaning of marriage as the union of one man and one woman is inscribed in our bodies as male and female. The protection of this meaning is a critical dimension of the “integral ecology” that Pope Francis has called us to promote. Mandating marriage redefinition across the country is a tragic error that harms the common good and most vulnerable among us, especially children. The law has a duty to support every child’s basic right to be raised, where possible, by his or her married mother and father in a stable home.

Jesus Christ, with great love, taught unambiguously that from the beginning marriage is the lifelong union of one man and one woman. As Catholic bishops, we follow our Lord and will continue to teach and to act according to this truth.

I encourage Catholics to move forward with faith, hope, and love: faith in the unchanging truth about marriage, rooted in the immutable nature of the human person and confirmed by divine revelation; hope that these truths will once again prevail in our society, not only by their logic, but by their great beauty and manifest service to the common good; and love for all our neighbors, even those who hate us or would punish us for our faith and moral convictions.

Lastly, I call upon all people of good will to join us in proclaiming the goodness, truth, and beauty of marriage as rightly understood for millennia, and I ask all in positions of power and authority to respect the God-given freedom to seek, live by, and bear witness to the truth.

6 Responses

  1. […] Good statement from USCCB […]

  2. An excellent statement. I am surprised. I expected rainbowing.

  3. Now would be a good time to reinstate the Prayers after Low Mass, in particular the prayer for the liberty of the Church.

  4. Funny that 5 paragraphs can have more substantive content than a 200-odd page encyclical.

  5. […] Source: Throne and Altar […]

  6. Bonald wrote, “[T]his is natural law we’re defending.”

    No, it is not. I would have hoped by now that we had all seen through the fallacy of the Neo-Scholastics, who believed that there is a “natural order,” governed by Natural Law, consisting of truths accessible to unaided human reason, as something that can be kept separate from the supernatural truths revealed in the Gospel. The saw the political and social order as having its own autonomy and argued that right reason can legitimately arrive at valid conclusions without recourse to supernatural revelation as their necessary source or sanction. This “two-tier” account of nature and grace was based on this view that the addition of “grace” was something super-added to a human nature that was already complete and sufficient in itself and apart from any intrinsic human need
    It is this view that Laberthonnière accused of being influenced by “a false theological notion of some state of pure nature and therefore imagined the state could be self-sufficient in the sense that it could be properly independent of any specifically Christian sense of justice.”

    Jacques Maritain exposed this fallacy: “Man is not in a state of pure nature, he is fallen and redeemed. Consequently, ethics, in the widest sense of the word, that is, in so far as it bears on all practical matters of human action, politics and economics, practical psychology, collective psychology, sociology, as well as individual morality,—ethics in so far as it takes man in his concrete state, in his existential being, is not a purely philosophic discipline. Of itself it has to do with theology…” Hence, his insistence that “the knowledge of human actions and of the good conduct of the human State in particular can exist as an integral science, as a complete body of doctrine, only if related to the ultimate end of the human being . . . the rule of conduct governing individual and social life cannot therefore leave the supernatural order out of account”

    That is why Maurice Blondel insisted that we must never forget “that one cannot think or act anywhere as if we do not all have a supernatural destiny. Because, since it concerns the human being such as he is, in concreto, in his living and total reality, not in a simple state of hypothetical nature, nothing is truly complete (boucle), even in the sheerly natural order”

    As M. Laberthonnière said of his Jesuit opponent: “The Christianity he describes is not my Christianity; the moral law he embraces is not the one I acknowledge; most fundamentally, I suspect that the Deity he recognizes is not the God who revealed Himself at Sinai.”

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