Thinking for oneself is overrated.

I’ve watched others do it.  I’ve seen the results.

5 Responses

  1. You might enjoy this old Daniel Larison post at W4, if you haven’t seen it.

  2. Agreed.

    It is also unavoidable.

  3. […] I would like to say a few words in favor of the conformist, or at least in sympathy with him.  You will have guessed that I am arguing on my own behalf, and it is true that I am a conformist, but only a timid little closet one, not one of those brave Irish priests who endure the rebuke of the nonconformist multitude and the nonconformist hierarchy.  We believe that individuals and collectives should conform to norms imposed on them “from above”.  Most especially does this apply to the Church that Christ founded and on which He imprinted His form.  We value truth rather than self-expression, piety rather than novelty, unity rather than diversity, obedience rather than freedom.  You will say that this is all because I have a childish need for certainty, that I am unable or unwilling to think for myself.  Surely if I were willing to think for myself, I would come to think the way everyone else does; I would start questioning Catholicism and stop questioning liberalism.  Perhaps I would, but that hardly recommends the practice to me. […]

  4. […] I would like to say a few words in favor of the conformist, or at least in sympathy with him.  You will have guessed that I am arguing on my own behalf, and it is true that I am a conformist, but only a timid little closet one, not one of those brave Irish priests who endure the rebuke of the nonconformist multitude and the nonconformist hierarchy.  We believe that individuals and collectives should conform to norms imposed on them “from above”.  Most especially does this apply to the Church that Christ founded and on which He imprinted His form.  We value truth rather than self-expression, piety rather than novelty, unity rather than diversity, obedience rather than freedom.  You will say that this is all because I have a childish need for certainty, that I am unable or unwilling to think for myself.  Surely if I were willing to think for myself, I would come to think the way everyone else does; I would start questioning Catholicism and stop questioning liberalism.  Perhaps I would, but that hardly recommends the practice to me. […]

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